Winners of UROS-2021 research projects awards

Maths & Physics News

In the university-wide Undergraduate Research Opportunities Scheme (UROS), the in 2021 are students of School of Mathematics and Physics:

Roksana Kulengowska, with project “Calculating the Hill Sphere of Known Exoplanets: Which Exoplanets Could Host Moon Systems?“, under supervision of Dr Phil Sutton, and

Christopher Denison, with project “Lamellar Block Copolymers Under Shear Flow“, under supervision of Dr Marco Pinna & Dr Javier Diaz.

These wins continue the successful participation of our students in previous years: in 2020 one of the two runners-up for People’s Choice Award was

Henry Macpherson, with project “Mathematical modelling of polymer capsules“, under supervision of Dr Martin Greenall (https://staffnews.lincoln.ac.uk/2020/11/30/uros-award-winners/)

The 2021 winners were announced at the on-campus UROS Celebration event on the 11th November, in Skal Tipi:

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Astro-Chat: White dwarfs

Science views

an astro-chat with

Professor Don Kurtz

Visiting Professor, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Lincoln, UK

Friday, 10 December 2021

7:00-8:00 pm

Live online

Book a place

Stars do not live forever. They are born out of the gas and dust in our Milky Way Galaxy and spend much of their lives fusing hydrogen to helium, the same energy source that powers our terrifying hydrogen bombs, but will one day provide abundant, clean, cheap power to us. Over the coming billions of years the Sun will swell to become a red giant star, boiling the Earth’s oceans and blowing away its atmosphere. It will then become a white dwarf star mostly made of carbon and only about the size of Earth. The oldest white dwarfs that formed when the Milky Way was young, 11 billion years ago, have now cooled to 3000 C, and crystallised into giant carbon crystals…

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Astro-Chat: Juno at Jupiter

Science views

an astro-chat with

Professor Don Kurtz

Visiting Professor, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Lincoln, UK

Friday, 24 September 2021

7:00-8:00 pm

Live online

Book a place

Jupiter is big. Really Big. (Apologies to Douglas Adams). It is the beautiful, bright planet that is visible all night now, rising in the east just after sunset, then travelling across the sky to set around sunrise. It will be with us through the end of the year. In our solar system, this is the big one. Jupiter has more mass than all the other planets, asteroids, comets and moons added together. In Roman mythology Jupiter is god of the sky and king of the gods. His wife, Juno, is the daughter of Saturn and mother of Mars. This is an illustrious family. Ten years ago, NASA launched a mission to Jupiter, naming it after Juno. It is a long way to…

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Astro-Chat: Venus – Earth’s Evil Twin

Science views

an astro-chat with

Professor Don Kurtz

Visiting Professor, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Lincoln, UK

Friday, 30 July 2021

7:00-8:00 pm

Live online

Book a place

Venus is the beautiful, bright “evening star” I can see now from South Africa. It is more difficult for those of you in Lincoln at high northern latitudes. Venus is not a star. It is a rocky planet that is a near twin to our Earth in size. But it is 30% closer to the Sun, and therein lies all the difference. Venus’s atmosphere is 96% Carbon Dioxide (CO2), the potent greenhouse gas that is causing climate change here on Earth, where it makes up only 0.04% of the atmosphere. Venus is the hottest planet in the solar system – 460 C! The thick atmosphere has a surface pressure 90 times that here on Earth at sea level. The clouds…

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How To Derive The Roche Limit

The Roche Limit is the distance that a moon or satellite can be to a planet before the gravitational tides pull it apart. At the Roche limit the gravitational tides from the planet are balanced by the self gravity of the satellite. At closer distances the satellite is pulled apart. When further away from the Roche limit the satellite can hold itself together under its own gravitational forces.

In this video we balance these two forces and find an expression for the distance at which objects would be pulled apart by the planets tides.

How To Use Supernovas For Distance Measurements

Dr Phil Sutton

When discussing the brightness of stars we typically refer to apparent and absolute magnitude. Apparent magnitude of a star how bright we observe a star from Earth compared to the star Vega. Stars bright than Vega have a lower magnitude, while stars dimmer have higher magnitude than Vega. Stars that are further away will have a lower apparent magnitude. Therefore, we can use this relationship to calculate how far away a star is, if we know its absolute magnitude. The absolute magnitude is how bright a star would be from some standard distance, which is 10 parsecs. Knowing the spectral type of the star can help identify its absolute magnitude.

Type 1a supernovas occur when white dwarf stars pull material of a nearby red giant star. Once the white dwarf hits the upper mass limit of 1.4 solar masses it approaches the ignition temperature for carbon. This causes a runway…

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